How I “Empower Myself” to Travel

I recently published an Op-Ed with the Baltimore City Paper. It’s called “I’m From West Baltimore- I can literally live Anywhere.” The Baltimore City Paper was where I started my career as a freelance journalist about 3 years ago now. I wrote an Op-Ed about how it felt to write about the Baltimore Uprising from Brazil. I made $100 dollars, which at the time felt like a $1000. That’s because I was/ still perpetually broke. As a writer who travels (I’m starting to question if I’m a travel writer or just a writer that travels and will write about that at another time) I’m living a life that is hand to mouth. This term “Hand to Mouth” I straight up stole from a writing buddy/mentor Bani Amor. To me, it means when I make money I spend it just as fast. There is no saving or budgeting really, cause I usually know exactly how much I have in my bank account down the cent at all times. There a great gif. of a train with a magnetic crane, lifting the track it just went over and placing it in front of itself to go forward. Basically making it’s track up as it goes along. This also makes it impossible for the train to go backwards because that track it was just on, is now the same track it’s edging over. Because of the way the crane is set up, its reach is only but so long and this train ends up going in a circle. That’s me in a nutshell. That’s what I’ve been on since graduating college in 2015.

Someone asked me how I empower myself to travel. I get a lot of inquiries like this. How do I afford it? To be quite honest, I can’t afford it. I’m actually in debt. And not just student loan debt, no, no, I got my first credit card last summer. And all I’ll say about that is, thank God, I didn’t get one sooner. But I digress. My empowerment to travel is pretty simple, and I’l share it in a listcle below.

DISCLAIMER: This is MY experience, I’m not advising anyone to follow my lead. Results will truly vary.

1. I live with my mom.  

Yep. That’s the biggest way I’ve managed to travel. My mother claims me on her taxes and allows me to sleep in her home (when I’m in Baltimore) rent free. I help out when I can, but in honestly, I’m more emotionally supportive than financial. My mother is an artist herself and has always pushed me to explore. From sending me away to sleep away camps or conferences or even to stay at her friends place, my mother has always encouraged my wanderlust, sometimes even facilitating it. She’s my number source of empowerment. My family is the second major source of empowerment. If it weren’t for the support of my family, specifically my sister and my grandmother I would not be the well traveled writer that I am today. Also, friends! I have really great friends that take care of me and vice versa.

2. I’m from West Baltimore.

Not to be redundant, but read the article. Something I didn’t mention in that Op-Ed(the word count was 1000 words) was the 90’s campaign to “get out of the hood”. From books to TVs shows, growing up all I was taught was to grow up and GET OUT. I was smart (read: well behaved) so if I didn’t want to end up pregnant or underemployed, if I wanted to truly be “successful” I had to “make it out of the hood”. Many of my peers did this. And now we’re all considering moving back because gentrification has made Baltimore one of the last affordable places to live on the NorthEast. And growing up in a majority black city and then moving to a none majority black city can be…challenging.

3. I’m introverted and nosy at the same time.

I like to quietly mind my business, or quietly observe people. I listen like my life depends on it, cause usually it does. I meet a lot of people and end up living with them very quickly for weeks at a time, and so far I’ve been lucky. I’ve had a few tight situations and plenty of awkward moments but my need for solitude means I could live in a closet and be content. It also means people project a lot on to me. I’ve played therapist to many and enjoyed it honestly. As a writer these are moments I’d actually pay for. And to a certain extent I do, as a guest I usually pay rent to live with a stranger and over the course of a few days I not only learn about a new place, I also learn about them, and then I move on. Some places/people are harder to move on from others but luckily for me the introversion makes the emotional de-attachment easier.

4. I’m not hard to please.

I’m kinda lame and I’ve always been old. Last weekend I spent my Saturday night in the supermarket getting excited at the avaliabilty and low cost of Pringles and Aunt Jemimas pancake mix in Cali, Colombia. Most of my my fondest travel memories abroad have been cooking with friends or hanging out at a park or beach and trading stories. I’m not vacationing. I’m not chasing luxury abroad, (no shade, I just can’t afford it) if anything I’m looking for something that probably doesn’t even exist (but that’s another blog post for another day). In general, I do the same cheap things abroad that I’d do at home. Cook my food, read, write, take a dance class if I have time/money, be depressed, be anxious, sleep. Two months ago, I spent most of my time in Ecuador indoors reading books and it was a highlight of my year. When I’m at home and preparing for travel, I’m very frugal and saving up as much money as I can. I’m working ALL the jobs and hustling like crazy. I’m rarely indulging in brunch or clothes (all though as I get older this gets harder) And when I’m traveling? I’m hustling, selling stories, clothes, photos, teaching english and doing whatever I have to in order to survive.

5. I ain’t too proud to beg.

Growing up my friends would make fun of me for always asking for some of their food. It wasn’t like my mother didn’t feed me, but if they had something that I wanted I would always ask if they’d give it to me. I’m not ashamed to ask for what I want or need. I actually didn’t know this was a weird trait to have as a black women until I got to college and began reading about gender dynamics and race and learned that most people are used to black women providing and not the other way around. Thank God I never had to internalize that bullshit. There is an art to asking. One that as a community organizer I’ve mastered because I’ve always been in positions where I had to ask for what I needed.  Seriously, I stayed with a fellowship or scholarship in school. I’ve had quite a few successful funding campaigns online. As a matter of fact, I’m currently raising funds to pay for tuition to attend the VONA/Voices writing workshop this summer. Click here to read more and donate.  Being without makes me go after what I want and need, it also makes me a very giving person, because you can’t ask or receive with a closed fist.

So that’s about it. Aside from my blue passport which gives me privilege to go virtually anywhere, these are the things that empower me to travel.

thanks for reading.