“Drapetomania; The Strong Urge to Escape”

“This is not a mistake”, my mother said. And then she took my hand and prayed for me. I cried into my hands. Broke down ugly cry as if I were a toddler. These tears were full of joy and fear and relief in being able to come to my mother with these “good” problems.

I’m preparing to open my first solo show at Waller Gallery. It consists of photography and videos from my life in Brazil, Colombia and Ecuador. Making this show happen has been no easy feat. I’m learning so much about the medium of photography, about the business of art, about collaborating, about being vulnerable and being seen. 

Drapetomania was once a medical diagnosis used to explain why enslaved Africans ran away from the plantation. This was a racist and fabricated diagnosis of the human imperative to flee servitude. In her first solo exhibition, Nia Hampton shows the results of her own bout of “drapetomania” after graduating college and moving to Brazil. She captured the following on her journey through South America: environmental racism, African spiritual practices, femicide, black Brazilian feminism, haircut culture, and Love.

taken from WallerGallery.com.

When I took a leap of faith and left for Brazil, I didn’t know enough about what I was attempting to do to fear it. The tightness in my chest and butterflies in my stomach felt more like excitement. I didn’t think it would turn into a photography show opening, I really didn’t forsee this photo show creating a space to host “The Black Femme Supremacy Film Fest”a one day film festival highlighting black people of any nationality who identity with feminine gender expression.  Now, post adventures in South America, I’m starting a new chapter. Becoming an artist. A successful and confident one at that. Which means, this blog will change yet again. But I will always share my journey here, cause that’s what it’s all about!

 

“Black Bodies in Travel” on drumBOOTY radio

Last month I had the opportunity to catch up with Abdu Ali on his new podcast drumBOOTY radio on maskfm. It’s an incredibly insightful chat about my experiences in South America, most notably Brazil and Abdu’s time spent touring in Europe.

Click this link to access the podcast. 

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I’m teaching a class!

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This class is about exploring the personal, practical and political while traveling internationally in a Black Body. Specifically for black bodies traveling to black or “colonized” countries.

It’s essentially the study abroad preparedness workshop, I wish I had gotten.

In this class we will read and ponder on topics like colonialism. globalization, anti-blackness, class-ism and escapism.

The intention of this class is to get the student prepared for the specific blend of enlightenment that happens when a black person leaves the States in hope of communing with others like themselves.

Register for the course here.

VONA my VONA

I’m still pretty high from my week at VONA.

I feel like Celie after Shug Avery kissed her.

Who knew that writing about dystopia, environmental racism, immersion therapy, death and leeches that make you suicidal would make me so happy? Tananarive Due, our fearless leader knew, that’s who. I like to think of her as the Beyonce of Speculative Fiction. I know- I know, big shoes to fill. And if Tananarive is Beyonce, who is Octavia Butler?

OCTAVIA BUTLER IS GOD.

At least she is to me when it comes to this speculative fiction book writing thing. So Tananarive Due is Beyonce, aka Jesus. And me and my SPECCC FICCC (rocketship) group, well-we are the disciples. A ragtag group of queerish nerds who dream of worlds without whiteness, the male gaze and dragons, (except the occasional neccesary one). We loved on each other, made each other feel seen and ate really well together. I’ve never felt safer. And that’s saying a lot considering what the past 6 months have been like for me.

I spent most of June in California experiencing my own surreal reality as a nomadic black girl tryna make it home while traversing rapidly gentrifying terrains. I got called a nigger in Santa Jose and was pick pocketed in San Fran and oh wee it’s a jungle over there. The homeless population in LA are aggressively ignored and white people don’t make eye contact and I think most black people are in prison. At least, that’s how it felt to me, over there. So coming home to the East Coast and being at VONA with all it’s radical-ness really reset me in the best ways. I can’t stop telling all my creative friends about the community I found. I feel so in love with the people at my writing workshop. In my dreams we’re writing the next season of Black Mirror and working on the next major Marvel film. We’re publishing all the books and getting all the coins and changing the current reality one spec fic story at a time.